Prairie Songster

Prairie Songster

Prairie Songster – Western Meadowlark

Limited Edition of 100,  18″ x 24″ – $150.00

Open Edition 10″ x 13″  $40.00

 

In the spring, the Western Meadowlark’s call echoes across the Alberta prairies as the sound bounces from fence posts to power lines. It prefers arid, short grasslands and farm country as it feeds on seeds and insects such as grasshoppers, caterpillars, cutworms and beetles. The mottled brown back is excellent camouflage that blends with the grasses. When the meadowlark is on the ground, the only detection of the bird is through its movement. The meadowlark can be found in southern Alberta in the summer, but it winters along the southwest coast of British Columbia and south into the United States.

In the composition, “Prairie Songster – Western Meadowlark,” the sign of spring perches on an old fence post to sun itself and announce its presence. The song is low-pitched and flute-like compared with its eastern counterpart which has a clear high-pitched whistle. Both are almost identical in appearance, but are distinguished by range and song. The yellow breast, black bib, and outer white tail feathers capture the sunshine, and the rich melodious song advertises its territory. This posturing attracts mates as well as predators. When necessary, the meadowlark will descend into the cattails and mysteriously disappear choosing to turn its back and fold away the white tail feather flags.



Prairie Songster