Tundra Reflections

Tundra Reflections


Tundra Reflections – Tundra Swans

Limited Edition of 100,  24.5″ x 20″ – $160.00

Open Edition  10″ x 13″ – $40.00

 

Tundra and trumpeter swans breed in the far north. The smaller tundra swan is wide spread in North America and is also called the whistling swan. In Europe and Asia this species is known as the Bewick’s Swan. Both are regarded as members of the same species, the tundra swan. These swans are half the size of trumpeter swans which are restricted to range from Alaska to northwestern Canada and United States. Besides the difference in size, the tundra swan has a bill which is slightly concave in profile and slopes back into a rounded head. The trumpeter swan’s bill slopes back into a flattened forehead. Also, the tundra swan has a naked yellow spot in front of the eye called a lore; whereas, the lore of a trumpeter swan is black. Both swans are entirely white with black eyes, bills, and feet. Novices confuse tundra swans with white Snow Geese, which are smaller with shorter necks, black wing tips, and pink bills.

In the composition, “Tundra Reflections”, two swans are exercising their wings before flight. The morning sun highlights their white feathers and casts shadows on their graceful bodies. The wind and the flapping of their wings cause the water’s surface to ripple. The distorted images reflected from the dark surface of the water complete the scene. Such imagery adds warmth and drama to the wilderness tundra of the north.

Tundra Reflections