Whiskey Jack Warning

Whiskey Jack Warning

Whiskey Jack Warning – Gray Jays

Limited Edition of 100,  24″ x 18″ – $150.00

Open Edition  13″ x 10″ – $40.00

 

The name given to the common gray jay of Canada by the native Algonquin Indians was Whiskey John. The English modified the name to Whiskey Jacks, but the bird has more colour variations than names. The gray jays found in the forests of western and northern Alberta have a white collar and forehead, and have considerably darker upper parts than the southern birds. The secondary wing feathers and tail feathers are edged with frosty white, which is lacking in the Pacific coast gray jays. The whiskey jack has a similar body shape to a chickadee with fluffy plumage, short bill, large head without a crest, and a long tail. The gray jay, however, is more than twice the size of a chickadee.

In the composition, “Whiskey Jack Warning”, two gray jays, which usually travel in pairs, are perched on a branch of a white spruce. They are generally very quiet, but bold and curious. These characteristics have given them the nickname, “camp robbers.” Frequenting backwoods camps and picnic grounds for scraps, whiskey jacks often steal food that is unattended. They are very secretive, but on occasion they scold or alert each other by giving a “whiskey jack warning.”

Whiskey Jack Warning